Tuesday, October 7, 2008

The chickens are trembling in their coops...

It's been a tough few days out there for every one's favorite fowl.** You know, there must be a million ways to cook a chicken and personally, I'm suddenly having a craving for my favorite, apricot-walnut chicken cutlet. Wouldn't it be cute if some Rabbi somewhere pardoned a chicken, much like the annual presidential pardon of the turkey on Thanksgiving? And that would be so appropriate for the Jewish holiday season!

I've collected some scenes from around the web to show you what this ritual is like:










In my family, we just use money, and give it to some worthwhile charities.

May Yom Kippur be a meaningful day for us all, filled with forgiveness and love.

[**Some background: In the days leading up to Yom Kippur, the most solemn day of the Jewish calendar (in which Jews spend the day praying for atonement for their sins), it is customary to find a surrogate to "transfer" our sins over to. Many people use a chicken. Others give charity as a way to atone for their sins.]

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FYI, Haveil Havalim is up at Write Like She Talks. As always, a great round-up of what's going on around the Jewish Blogosphere.

6 comments:

Leora said...

My daughter did something or another with 18 cents today. I prefer that to the swinging chicken business.

Gmar tov.

rutimizrachi said...

The Dearly Beloved calls this procedure "Shake 'n' Bake." (It is the custom to offer the chicken "kaporos" to the poor, so they will have what to eat.)

hesh said...

That sillouette is evil looking

muse said...

I understand it in principle, but I don't like the idea of being there.

Ben-Yehudah said...

B"H

As a "right wing religious fanatic" who is discussed by the chipping away of Torah in this "state," I must say that there is no necessity for this ritual, and I defy anyone to show me the source for it being so.

It is truly beyond me.

Slaughtering an animal is a billion times more humaine. {Yes, I'm a meat eater.}

Even a broken clock is right twice a day. So, I will have to agree with the "basar zeh retzah" {meat is murder} crowd on this one.

On a positive note, I saw the protest against the kapparoth in Mahaneh Yehudah,... no screaming, no yelling, just talking between the two sides.

I'd like to think

Ben-Yehudah said...

...that they were listening, too.